POPs Added to the Stockholm Convention in 2009

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POPs Added to the Stockholm Convention in 2009

ACAT’s Arctic Indigenous delegation at the Fourth Conference of Parties in Geneva, Switzerland, May 2009
ACAT’s Arctic Indigenous delegation at the Fourth Conference of Parties in Geneva, Switzerland,
May 2009

At their 2009 Conference of Parties, signatories to the treaty agreed to phase out nine additional chemicals, the first time new chemicals had been added to the original “deadly dozen”. The ban took effect on August 26, 2010.

The 9 new POPs added to the Stockholm Convention:

  • Alpha hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH) – byproduct from the production of the insecticide lindane.
  • Beta hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH) – byproduct from the production of the pesticide lindane.
  • Chlordecone – agricultural pesticide; no longer in production.
  • Hexabromobiphenyl – flame retardant chemical; no longer produced, but still in use in common household products.
  • Hexabromodiphenyl ether and heptabromodiphenyl ether (commercial octabromodiphenyl ether) – flame retardant chemicals; no longer produced, but still in use in common household products.
  • Lindane – broad-spectrum insecticide. Lindane is still being produced.
  • Pentachlorobenzene (PeCB) – no longer intentionally produced, but there could be unintentional production as a byproduct.
  • Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), its salts and perfluorooactane sulfonyl fluoride (PFOS-F) – industrial chemicals widely used in electric and electronic parts, fire fighting foam, photo imaging, hydraulic fluids and textiles. PFOS is still being produced.
  • Tetrabromodiphenyl ether and pentabromodiphenyl ether (commercial pentabromodiphenyl ether) – flame retardant chemicals; no longer produced, but still in use in common household products.

Additional Resources:

Learn more on the Stockholm Convention website.